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20121205
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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
reports and plenty of speculation about who might be helping north cia korea in their technology. of course it is almost impossible to get information out of north korea. it is an incredibly isolated, closed regime. the information officially we get from that country is through its state-run media. so nothing gets out of north korea unless it is choreographed through k cna, the state-run news agency and the state-run television and it is highly choreographed and many would say propaganda. what we hear from north korea is what north korea wants the world to hear. it is very difficult to get an indication on that. here in seoul, one senior government official told me they are concerned, even with failure that north korea carrying out with rocket launches they are still learning. they are learning from mistake and can get better. this is a trial and era for north korea. the more they do, even if they are failures in the yeas of the international community they are still learning from them. >> paula hancocks reporting live in south korea. we have this just in from our erin burnett wh
blow in their own backyard. >>> a new movie has controversy surrounding around the cia analyst credited with finding osama bin laden and a sex abuse verdict topples the wall of secrecy that surrounded an ultraorthodox jewish sect. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> first this just coming into cnn. word that michigan's governor has just signed a law that many believe will significantly weaken union power in the state. one of the organized labor movements few remaining strongho strongholds. there was massive protests as lawmakers approved a so-called right to work law which allows members to forego paying dues. poppy harlow is in lansing in the state capital for us. you just spoke to the governor about all of this. what did he tell you? >> reporter: well, i spoke with the governor just ahead of that announcement where he confirmed that he indeed did sign this legislation into lawmaking michigan a right to work state. a sea change for this state, wolf. the governor saying this is a "opportunity" to stand up for workers and flying in the face of what many of those workers
team of katherine bigelow and mark bowe recreates how it all happened, from the female cia analyst who finally figured out where he was hiding to the navy s.e.a.l.s who killed him. >> there are two narratives about the location of osama bin laden. >> reporter: the controversy? the obama administration has faced accusations it gave undeserved access to the film makers. in real life, everyone involved in the hunt for bin laden remains sworn to secrecy. but the film makers say they got firsthand accounts. they just won't say exactly how that happened. >> i think as a reporter you would understand we take protecting our sources and sort of the exact methodology of our sourcing pretty seriously, just in the same way if i asked you how exactly did you source that story. >> reporter: katherine, when you hear mark talk this way, are you a journalist or a film maker? >> that's a good question. well, i certainly try to be as faithful to the research as possible and make a good movie and make a film that was timely. >> reporter: but how much access they got is the issue. >> obviously things went
scenes of a cia officer interrogating a detainee. other abuse and torture is shown in detail, leaving in doubt does it go to too far and is it accue in the interrogation and torture techniques in the hunt for osama bin laden and finding osama bin laden. peter bergen was an unofficial adviser in the him. his new book is "man hunt." he joins me now with former cia officer bob behr. you have seen the movie, i have seen it as well. you were an an paid adviser. what did they get wrong? there was a lot of reporter the screen writer did to kind of suss out the facts. in terms of the torture sequence were that right in that waterboarding led to the information that led to bin laden. >> not according to the senate intelligence committee. the film is a great film and it covers a lot of themes about the war on terror and the decade-long struggle against al qaeda. as a sort of overall picture, there's a lot of things that are good about the film. but the fact that is senate intelligence committee which has spint three years investigating the claim that coercive techniques led to bin laden amongst
out where he was. and a cia team is responsible for that. >> right. >> and then it's the story of how they went in there and killed him. >> yes. >> the first part of the story centers around actress jessica chastain plays a cia person. is that a real person? >> well, again, they're all based on real people. >> right. so there is a real cia agent that she plays who found the link to the courier who took them. >> with her tenacity, her courage and her dedication, you know, really drove that lead forward. and gave it a lot of traction. you know, and i think the interesting thing about the movie is it really puts you in her shoes. it puts you in that intelligence hunt and gives you a glimpse into the intelligence community and the dedication of these men and women including her. but all the men and women that are involved in something -- in an operation that is this complicated and this arduous. >> have you met her, or did mark meet her? >> well, we protect our sources. i'll leave it at that. >> you know, were you surprised that there was a woman who was so intricately involved? because a
team of katherine big ga lo and mark bo, recreates how it all happened from the female cia analyst who finally figured out where he was hiding to the navy s.e.a.l.s who killed him. >> there are two narratives about the location of osama bin laden. >> reporter: the controversy? the obama administration has faced accusations it gave undeserved access to the filmmakers. in real life, everyone involved in the hunt for bin laden remains sworn to secrecy. but the filmmakers say they got firsthand accounts. they just won't say exactly how that happened. >> i think as a reporter you would understand we take prot t protecting our sources and sort of the exact methodology of our sourcing pretty seriously, just in the same way if i asked you how did you source that story. >> katherine, when you hear mark talk this way, are you a journalist or a filmmakerer? >> that's a good question. well, i certainly tried to be as faithful to the research as possible and make a good movie and make a film that was timely. >> reporter: but how much access they got is the issue. >> obviously things went wrong her
is on an advisory board at the state department and one at the cia. so clearly, this man has got important matters on his desk. how exposed could we be if the chinese have access to all of his writings? >> very exposed. and this is nothing new. if you take a look at a typical burglar and he wants to break into a yard and has this hardened lock on a fence that he cannot cut through, what is he going to do? he's going to cut the chain. we're not going to go after a facility that spends billions of our tax dollars on securing their networks. we're going to go after somebody who works outside, somebody who has access to internal resources. it's called a u-turn attack. what they do is they find that weak link such as a home computer or a personal computer belonging to a former admiral or cia agent, and they attack that. they get access to that, and then they use their vpn connection inbound to get access to the same resources he would have access to or she would have access to based on their security level. megyn: because we're hearing more and more of this. they say the fbi's looking into -- it's not
wire is a sports analyst. chad sweet is a former cia director of operations. and ken baer is a white housed a virus. todd carmichael is the host of dangerous grounds. howard kurtz will join us. and economic diane swonk rounds things out for us today. "starting point" begins right now. >>> good morning. welcome, everybody. let's begin with developing news this morning. a tsunami threat to tell you about was just lifted in japan. the country was rocked by a powerful 7.3 magnitude earthquake. it hit off the coast of tokyo. the buildings there shaking. you could see some of the video showing the degree to which they were shaking. alex, what's the latest? >> reporter: it has been a very, very tense few hours here in japan after you mentioned a 7.3 magnitude earthquake striking late here in the day on friday. but just in the past 90 minutes or so, the all clear has been given. the tsunami warning has been lifted. that's great news for the people here. there's no signs of any significant damage. no reports of any deaths. just a few injuries at this point. we also have to keep in mind the nu
asking us "do you work for the c.i.a.? do you work for israel?" a lot more talk about jihad. and often these voices are drowning out the voices of more moderate activists. >> pelley: anything can happen in this volatile part of the world. clarissa, thanks very much. egypt remains divided too. thousands protests tonight both for and against president mohammed morsi. some tried to scale the walls of the presidential palace. morsi is insisting on a national vote this saturday on a new constitution, but opponents say it takes away too many of their rights. a killer is caught on video just before he pulled the trigger. how sand saved some homes from sandy. and a mini-shuttle heads off on a secret mission to space. when the cbs evening news continues from washington. ♪ [ male announcer ] campbell's green bean casserole. it's amazing what soup can do [ male announcer ] campbell's green bean casserole. sometimes life can be well, a little uncomfortable. but when it's hard or hurts to go to the bathroom, there's dulcolax stool softener. dulcolax stool softener doesn't make you go, it just mak
for osama bin laden "zero dark 30." this year of the cia agent a little more complicated than the hollywood spy version portrayal. the post says she was actually passed over for a poe motion shortly after the mission that killed bin laden. also it says she took heat for ties to filmmakers and there was jealousy over her fame and that led to internal friction within the agency. the post says after being given a prestigious award for her work this agent sent an e-mail to dozens of others saying they didn't deserve to share in the accolades. >> not good. >> not getting along very well inside the cia, apparently. >> in the a smart move either. >>> for an expanded look at all of our top stories, head to cnn.com/earlystart. also follow us on twitter and on facebook. just search for early start cnn. >> it's made of steel but it's not a steal by any means. the gift card craze that has some coffee lovers paying way more than face value. look! over time, cascade complete pacs fight film buildup two times better than finish quantum to help leave glasses sparkling. cascade. the clear choice. but when i
former cia operative and contributor bob bayer to show you what the impact of a single shell of gas would be in launched on homs in syria. the large swath of the city that would be affected. it's estimated about 18,000 people would be killed in a day. let's get straight to barbara starr. and barbara, what have you learned tonight? >> well, you know, as tragic and serious as this is for the people of syria, this now has regional implications throughout the middle east. intelligence services from israel, turkey, jordan, lebanon, all the countries surrounding syria are talking with the united states around the clock about this very scenario because if there were to be god forbid a chemical attack, the concern is some could drift across borders. worse even as tragic as that would be, what if the regime collapses, terrorists move in, insurgent groups move in and grab some chemical material. they could take it across the borders into the neighbors countries and have a full fledged crisis in the region. >> there has been talk that assad may try and seek asylum. what are you being told about that
evidence that some of the shoulder-fired missiles that the c.i.a. was trying to track down in libya, and f-16's may have migrated to syria bringing down a helicopter and fighter jet last week. reports that save gas has been loaded on to canisters, the united states set up a task force at a base north of jordan, in amman, that included 150 special forces working with the military of jordan to secure assad's chemical weapons. >> the world is watching. the president of the united states has made very clear there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a tell mistake by using the chemical weapons on their own people. >>reporter: the pentagon is aware a meeting of rebel groups elected a 30-member military command structure and two-thirds is made up with ties to the muslim brotherhood. >>shepard: and damascus and the airport is in the middle of a war zone. fighters declared the airport is "a legitimate target, approach at your own risk." grueling battles today on streets of the capital city. this video showing someone trying to put at the flames which engulfed the car. fox cannot confirm
. "outfront" tonight, national security contributor fran townsend who is on the cia and homeland security external advisory board and noah shachtman. noah, what do we think is going on right now? at what point are they in this process? >> so the assad regime has hundreds of metric tons of the building blocks of sarin. basically two big building blocks. there's isopropanol which is rubbing alcohol and phosphorous compounds. those are kept separately in order to keep things safe. but the assad regime in small, limited quantities appears to have combined those two chemicals to make deadly sarin nerve agent and has loaded them on to aerial bombs. >> if that is true, fran, it's a very provocative thing. is it provocative enough that the u.s. now has to consider action? >> well, you know, the administration has not made it clear. what the president has said is that the use of such weapons would be a red line for the united states and her allies. but it's not clear, short of use, is this preparation, is the mixing of the precursor chemicals enough? as noah can tell you this is a very unstable su
of the cia. cedrick layton member of the joipt staff. what are those consequences? is the u.s. going to passing the point of no return here? >> well, it is, look, the most recent information suggests they're preparing to be able to launch these warheads containing gas and other chemical weapons. that's a problem because now, a military strike could trigger the dissemination of such weapons. what you have to do now is is get the timely tactical intelligence to interrupt the decision cycle. that is get between assad and the individual who presses the button to launch that missile. that's a very ask, very difficult, but now, that's the position we're really in. >> just to be honest, hasn't really seemed to be at least totally aware of everything happening every step of the way here. >> okay, except there was a wmd commission that looked at the failures in iraq and strengthened the committee. there are standards for assessing the credibility of sources. for how an analyst assesses a source and the information. and we know from the president's action against bin laden, he will ask the har
was -- after he won the election, and that is that the cia program, whether you find it repugnant or not, actually was effective with ksm and other people getting actionable intelligence that led to couriers that led eventually years later to the killing of osama bin laden. >> joe and mika, i saw a screening of the film on friday, and then i had breakfast on saturday with the screenwriter. it is powerful precisely because it just walks you through the story of what happened. and you can make all of the moral and political arguments that you want about what our policy on torture should be. this just tells you the story of what happened. there's no question in the record that the film shows and in other research that i've done that the name of the courier who led us to bin laden's hideout in abbottabad emerged in these harsh interrogations. and there's a weird way in watching this film in which every viewer will feel complicit in that process in a weird way. you're watching, hoping that they get the name, hoping that somehow you get enough information for the united states to act. it's a r
on what a chemical attack by bashar al assad would actually look like. we have a picture from former cia operative bob baer here to show you. this is showing you what the single impact of saren gas would be if it were launched on the western city of homs in syria. a large swath of the city would be impacted by a single shell. it's estimated 18,000 people would be killed in a day. let's get straight to cnn pentagon correspondent barbara starr. barbara, what have you learned tonight? >> well, you know, as tragic and serious as this is for the people of syria, this now has regional implications throughout the middle east. intelligence services from israel, turkey, jordan, lebanon, all the countries surrounding syria are now talking with the united states around the clock about this very scenario. because if there were to be, god forbid, a chemical attack, the concern is some of that could drift across boreder ed. worse, even as tragic as that would be, what if the regime collapses, terrorists move in, insurgent groups move in and grab some chemical material. they could take it across the bo
. is it too late? national security contributor fran townsend is a member of the cia and homeland security external advisory board and colonel cedric layton is a member of the staffs. what are the consequences? is the u.s. going to passing the point of no return here? >> it is. the most recent information suggests they're actually preparing to be able to launch these warheads containing sarin gas and other chemical weapons. that's a problem, right? now a military strike could inadvertently trigger the dissemination of such weapons, what you have to do is get the intelligence to interrupt the decision cycle. get between assad and the individual who presses the button to launch that missile. that's a very big ask from the intelligence community and very difficult. that's the positive we're really in. >> the intelligence community which to be honest hasn't really seemed to be at least, you know, totally aaware of everything happening every step of the way here. >> okay, except there's been -- there was a commission that looked at the failures in iraq and strengthened the intelligence communit
. possibly for the pentagon or cia. we don't know how serious that is. so far, it's all the same circle. >> that's right. >> musical chairs. >> musical chairs. the knock a lot of people in washington give to the obama white house it is too insular and he doesn't pull the kinds of expertise he needs into this white house. there's an opportunity in this second term for him to shake things up a little bit. you know, maybe to bring in new players, new faces who have been there from the clinton white house, and kind of help the dynamic and help the governing because a lot of people on capitol hill even democrats will tell you, he's not good at governing and building coalitions. maybe if he brought some folks in who knew how to do that there would be more give and take on the fiscal cliff issue, on the tax reform and entitlement reforms that we get next year, and there is a sense he really could use a bit of some fresh blood to make things a little easier going forward. >> chris, susan, and ari, thank you very much for all joining us. and the jobs report, more jobs are added in november than
a cia spy drone it captured back in 2011. that country's revolutionary guard has previously said that it recovered some information from the unmanned craft, but this time technicians say they have broken through all of its encryption, revealing that the drone had not carried out missions over any nuclear facilities before it went down. >>> well, north korea is extending the launch period for a controversial long-range rocket by a full week. its top scientists blame what they call a technical problem. north korea's government insists the rocket launch is part of a plan to put a satellite into orbit. however, the u.s. and our allies say the launch is really cover for testing missile technology that could be used to hit as far away as america. david piper live in bangkok, thailand, with the very latest. david? >> reporter: hi, megyn, yes. that famous phrase, houston, we've got a problem, well, the normally-secretive north korea has announced they've got a problem also with their planned missile launch over the next few weeks. now, what the spokesman for north korea said was that the
doctor who was a c.i.a. informant and helped us hunt down osama bin laden? he's reportedly been tortured in a pakinstani prison, according to his brother. back in june, the doctor was sentenced to 33 years behind bars for conspiring against pakistan. now six months into his sentence, is the united states doing enough to secure his release? let's talk to fox news legal analyst, peter johnson, jr. >> he's being left for dead. >> steve: he is? >> he's an honorary american. 3,000 lives, more, on september 11. >> steve: he's being tortured. >> he tried to get bin laden and infiltrated through a dna ruse, hepatitis vaccine. now he's been tortured, burned with cigarettes, according to reports. he's been shocked. he was blindfolded for a year. he had his hands tied behind his back for a year. the state department says we're trying to get him out. we're trying to negotiate a release. there was a bill the defense authorization act of 2013 trying to limit the $800 million going to counter insurgency funds in pakistan and saying, listen, the department of defense has to sign off that they're doing e
, last night, a former cia officer, robert bear, was speaking to anderson cooper. he described what the use of sarin could do. here's more of what he had to say. >> one round and the dispersion on that could be -- depends on the wind -- but you could take out, let's say a city like homs, you could take out a third of the city in the first couple of hours. anderson, this is a highly toxic liquid. it's a persistent agent. it's absolutely completely deadly. >> reporter: now, we've heard repeatedly from u.s. administration officials, u.s. president barack obama, u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton that the use of chemical weapons in syria was a red line for which syria and the bashar al assad regime would face severe consequences if they ever did cross that red line and utilize chemical weapons against the people of syria. >> and we have no idea what those severe consequences would be, right? >> reporter: that's right, we don't. you know, people speculate that this would mean some type of military intervention, but we also know that a lot of world powers have not wanted to intervene
a future republican director of the cia and the pentagon working for you, a future republican secretary of state working for you. >> steve hadley. >> and a future republican national security adviser as well as madeleine albright, another democrat, but you had as many powerful republican leaders, future leaders, are as powerful democratic leaders. >> the president should be doing every week, almost every day, you have to be meeting with some of them, having dinner with them, talking to them, chatting. >> yes. >> and also threatening occasionally. >> by the way, mika has circled all the dinner guests that you've had over the years. >> some of them worked for my dad. >> it's the same principle that works in journalism, everyone knows if you're going to garn aeroreport, it's far better to get a source face-to-face. it's far bettory get a source of the fund than a person via e-mail. >> and best of all to have a relati relationship with them. >> it's just intimacy that happens between a source and a reporter. >> this president does not like that. he's not comfortable in this person, lbj, jfk
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)